Do you have a beautiful hydrangea in your yard that’s starting to wilt? If so, don’t worry! You might not know it, but there are many reasons why this could be happening. In order to save your plant, we’ll need to figure out what the problem is first. In this blog post, we will explore what causes wilting plants and how you can save yours!

Common Reasons Why Your Hydrangea is Wilting

Heat Stress

If it’s been a hot summer and your hydrangea is wilting, that might be the cause of its issue. This usually happens because plants need some amount of shade to protect their leaves from too much heat in order for them to stay healthy and green. If they don’t get any protection against the sun, then they will start to wilt.

Underwatering

If your hydrangea is wilting and you have been watering the plant regularly, then this could be an issue of underwatering rather than over-watering. This usually happens because people don’t realize that they need to water their plants as soon as the soil starts to feel dry. The key is to make sure you aren’t giving your plant too much water either because that can cause a lot of damage as well.

Watering Hydrangea Too Much

Many people believe that hydrangea is drought tolerant plants, but the truth is they need at least one inch of water per week. In dry periods, you may have to give them extra water or even mulch around their roots to keep them happy and healthy.

Insufficient Light

The first thing to check is the amount of light that your hydrangea receives. If it does not get enough light, then it will begin to wilt. This can be a sign of overwatering or other environmental stresses like dry air and poor soil quality. Hydrangeas typically need more direct sun than shade but if you are experiencing the tips of your hydrangea wilting in full sun, then it could be getting too much light.

Too much light

If your hydrangea is wilting and you have been watering the plant regularly, then this could be an issue of too much light rather than under-watering. This usually happens because people don’t realize that they need to water their plants as soon as the soil starts to feel dry. The key is to make sure you aren’t giving your plant too much water either because that can cause a lot of damage as well.

High Temperature

A wilted hydrangea is usually caused by high temperatures. If the temperature outside is above 90 degrees and there’s not much shade, your plant could be experiencing a heat-related problem. The best thing to do if you suspect this issue with your plants would be to water them more often or move them into an area that has more shade.

High Humidity

High humidity can also cause your hydrangea to wilt, so if you live in an area that has high levels of humidity or foggy days, this could be the culprit for a wilted plant. If these conditions are preventing your plants from getting enough moisture from the air, make sure they have access to more water.

Sandy Soil

If your plant is located in soil that has a lot of sand or other particles, it can cause the roots to wither and die. This usually happens when there’s not enough organic matter in the soil for plants to use as an anchor. To prevent this from happening, you should amend your sandy soil with compost prior to planting anything in it.

Excessively Dry Soil

If your plant is in an area that doesn’t have a lot of rain or other sources of moisture, it can be caused to wither due to excessive dryness. This usually happens when the sun has been beating down on the plants for too long without any break. To prevent this from happening, you should water more frequently and make sure that the area is getting plenty of sunlight.

Fertilizer Burn

If you recently fertilized your plant, it could be experiencing a fertilizer burn. This is usually caused by an excessive amount of nitrogen being given to the plant at one time and can lead to brown leaves or stunting growth in general. You should amend this by watering with water that has four parts water for everyone part fertilizer.

Root System

A wilted hydrangea can also be caused by a loss of moisture in the roots. This usually happens when there’s not enough organic matter or water to keep them moist and cushioned from harsh conditions such as cold weather, windy days, or extreme heatwaves. If you suspect this is happening with your plant, you should amend the soil with compost and water more frequently.

Fungus or Disease

In some cases, a wilted hydrangea may be caused by fungus or disease on your plants. This can happen when there’s too much moisture in the air for prolonged periods of time. You should address this by watering in the morning hours instead of at night or when it’s raining.

Infestation

A wilted hydrangea may also be infested by bugs such as aphids, mealybugs or spider mites. You can use insecticidal soap to treat these pests and water with an organic fertilizer like seaweed extract which will help the plant resist future attacks from insects.

What Are Aphids?

Aphids are tiny insects that can be found on the underside of leaves and stems. They’re often green, brown, or pink in color and they have long antennae. Aphid infestation is common during flowering periods. The best way to control them is by using a strong jet spray so they’ll get washed off without causing significant damage.

What Are Mealybugs?

Mealybugs are tiny insects that can be found on the underside of leaves and stems. They’re often white or pink in color with a granular texture to them. Mealybug infestation is common during flowering periods. The best way to control them is by using insecticidal soap so they’ll get washed off without causing significant damage.

Transplantation

If you’ve recently transplanted your hydrangea, this could be the cause of it wilting. You should allow time for new roots to grow before watering and fertilizing again or transplanting with fresh soil instead.

How to Revive Your Hydrangea

Steps to Revive Your Hydrangea

  • Cut the leaves that are wilting so they don’t continue absorbing water.
  • If new shoots start growing, trim them off and let young plants grow more before cutting again.
  • Give your plant a good long drink of water by soaking it for at least an hour (longer if the plant is root-bound).
  • Add a weak solution of fertilizer to your watering can. If you are unsure, consult with an expert or read the label on your container.
  • After two weeks feed monthly using a balanced time-release fertilizer diluted according to directions on the package.

Note: You should water and fertilize plants every day if you live in a hot, dry climate.

Conclusion

A wilted hydrangea can have several causes depending on which is most prevalent in your climate. If your plant is wilting and you’re unsure of the cause, try out each possible reason on your plant to see which one helps it recover.

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