Rosemary is a beautiful herb that’s versatile and easy to grow. It can be used in everything from salads, to sauces, to soups. There are many ways you can use it but one of the easiest ways is by growing rosemary plants from cuttings in the water! This article will walk you through how to do this so you’ll never have trouble finding fresh herbs again!

Why Propagate Rosemary Plants From Cuttings?

Propagate rosemary plants from cuttings if you want to ensure your plant stock is healthy, or if the original parent plant dies and it’s not yet time for new planting. Propagating also allows you to make more of your favorite herb quickly, without having to find another place in your garden that will work. Plus, propagating rosemary plants from cuttings ensures that you’ll have a plant to give as a gift.

How To Propagate Rosemary

Growing Rosemary from cuttings is a good way to save money and share your plant with others. Whether you are just starting out in the garden or have been growing for years, propagating Rosemary this way will provide you with more plants that can be used for cooking all year long.

Instructions:

  • Fill a shallow dish with water and place your cuttings in it.
  • Rosemary is very easy to grow from cuttings, so make sure they are long enough that you have at least two nodes on the stem below the surface of the water. The best time for cutting propagation is early spring when temperatures outside are above 45 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Place the dish in a sunny spot and keep it moist, but not waterlogged. The cuttings will root quickly, so don’t wait too long before starting this project! You should start to see roots within three weeks of planting the cutting underwater and you can transfer these rooted pieces into your garden.

Tips:

  • Don’t let the water level drop below halfway down your stem before you start to see roots. This will cause rot, which is unhealthy for both the plant and your new baby plants so keep an eye on it!
  • If you can’t find a shallow dish that’s large enough or would prefer not to use one of yours, try using a clean bucket instead. It should be at least two inches deep in order to provide more surface area for the cuttings root system to grow into when planted in the soil outside later.
  • Cleaning out buckets after harvest season may also make for great compost – just make sure it cools off first then add some shredded newspaper as bedding material with some kindling in the bottom and set it on fire.
  • If you’ve been doing propagation for a while, try dipping your cuttings in root hormone before placing them underwater to see if that speeds uprooting time.
  • Rosemary can be propagated by division as well! Divide the plant into sections with at least two nodes per section and place them in well-draining soil. Plant the divisions close together to encourage new growth or try planting one section with two nearby companions for faster propagation.
  • You can also take stem cuttings from your established plants! Just use a sharp knife or scissors to make a clean cut about an inch below each node, then gently remove the leaves and any flower buds. Place these in a container of water to let them callus over for about two weeks before planting outside or potting up.
  • If you want your plant to grow taller, pinch off its top growth when it reaches eight inches tall and replants!
  • To help fight pests like spider mites, use a spray of water with insecticidal soap to help keep your plants healthy.

What Do You Need To Proparage Rosemary?

What You’ll Need:

  • vase of water (or a jar) that has holes on the bottom for drainage.
  • sharp knife or razor blade to cut cuts with.
  • a bunch of chopped rosemary leaves stems removed and cut in half vertically down their length. The topmost pieces should be about an inch long while the bottom ones should be about an inch and a half in length.

How to Harvest Rosemary Cuttings

  • Harvest a few sprigs of rosemary from your current plant. Cut off any brown or wilted leaves before replanting in water, and discard the end pieces that will not root well outside of the soil. You can also cut back some stems to encourage new growth on the plants you want to keep as they mature. This is also a good time to harvest any cuttings you want for propagation.
  • Fill an empty container with clean water, leaving about three inches of space at the top. The smaller the pot or jar, the more roots will grow and fill it up faster than in a tall planter or bucket. A shallow bowl is perfect if you have some leftover cuttings on hand.
  • Add a tablespoon of superphosphate fertilizer to the water, or create your own organic fertilizing formula using compost tea and/or worm castings. This will help feed your young plants until they establish roots in soil that is well established with microbes and beneficial bacteria – these are needed for strong growth from the beginning.
  • Place the cuttings in water, then cover them up with a piece of plastic wrap to help keep them moist until they are ready for planting outside or potting on inside. Check every day and make sure that the water level stays at least three inches from the top – if it gets too low add more clean water to fill it up.
  • Once the root systems of your cuttings have developed, you can either pot them on in soil or transplant them outside for summer growth and overwintering in colder climates. Even if they are just going to be grown indoors all winter long, any rosemary that is cared for properly will grow well under a grow light or fluorescent lights as long as they get at least eight hours of sunlight.
  • To pot on, place a small handful of good quality potting soil in the bottom of your container and plant the rosemary cuttings vertically about an inch deep. The roots should be facing down in the dirt; this will help them establish themselves and send out new shoots. Cover the roots with soil, leaving just a small amount of stem showing above ground for air circulation.
  • You can also try to transplant your rosemary outside this time of year if you live in an area where it is not too hot or cold. Dig a hole that is about twice as deep but only half as wide. Put some fertilizer in the bottom of it, then set your cutting into the ground and tamp down gently to seal it up with dirt.
  • Water generously when you finish planting so that any air pockets are filled in and water is seeping out from around the root system – this will keep them well hydrated for a good start to their first day outside.
  • Finally, you can also try rooting rosemary cuttings in water without any dirt or fertilizer if the soil is not cooperating during this time of year. Simply plant them as normal but leave out the potting mix and fertilizing – it will just absorb all the moisture that they need from being submerged.
  • It is important to remember that any rosemary cuttings will need at least eight hours of sunlight each day, and you should only ever harvest the last two or three inches from your plant. Pruning older stems will also encourage new growth on the plants you want to keep as they mature. So be sure to take care of your rosemary and trim it regularly for a healthy plant with lots of new, strong shoots.

When Can You Replant Rosemary?

Rosemary can be planted anytime during the summer, but you will need to take care of it. You should only ever harvest the last two or three inches from your plant and prune older stems in order for new growth on mature plants. The best time is when temperatures are below 50F at night, so as a general rule late September through early November is a good time to transplant.

Varieties of Rosemary

Roman Beauty Rosemary

Roman Beauty is a cultivar of rosemary that plants grow as individuals instead of in dense bushes, and it has often been used for cooking with meats. It grows to about chest height, so cuttings are easier to manage than the typical bushy varieties.

Arp Rosemary

The Arp Rosemary plant is a perennial that can grow up to 12 inches tall with woody stems and leaves. Its flowers are white, pink or purple. It has an aromatic taste similar to pine needles with hints of citrus and it is often used for culinary purposes.

Taurentius Rosemary

Taurentius Rosmarinus, also called Tarragon and Rosemary is a perennial that has been cultivated for centuries. Its name comes from the Russian taurus meaning bull or chamois and refers to its pungent flavor which resembles licorice. This herb’s culinary uses are extensive but it can be used medicinally as well.

Barbeque Rosemary

Barbeque Rosemary is a variety of rosemary that has been bred specifically for cooking. It contains less volatile oils than other varieties and its flavor profile can be quite similar to the taste of pork or lamb due to it being high in myrcene (a compound found in those meats).

Tuscan Blue Rosemary

Tuscan Blue Rosemary is a cultivar of the rosemary plant that has been bred to have a sweet and spicy flavor. It’s also very attractive, as it grows in an upright fashion with deep green leaves and lavender flowers.

Step By Step Instructions on How To Care For Rosemary Plants?

  • Plant your cuttings in well-drained soil with good air circulation.
  • You can also try to transplant your rosemary outside this time of year if you live in an area where it is not too hot or cold. Dig a hole that is about twice as deep but only half as wide. Put some fertilizer in the bottom of it, then set your cutting into the ground and tamp down gently to seal it up with dirt.
  • Water generously when you finish planting so that any air pockets are filled in and water is seeping out from around the root system – this will keep them well hydrated for a good start to their first day outside.
  • Finally, you can also try rooting roses without any dirt or fertilizer in the water. Simply take a stem and plant it into the jar like you would for any other cutting, then fill up to three inches of water around its base – this will keep them happy without needing any soil or fertilizer!
  • It is important to remember that any rosemary cuttings will need at least eight hours of sunlight each day, and you should only ever harvest the last two or three inches from your plant. Pruning older stems will also encourage new growth on the plants you want to keep as they mature. So be sure to take care of your rosemary and trim it regularly for a healthy plant with lots of new, strong shoots.
  • Rosemary can be planted anytime during the summer but if temperatures are below 50F at night then late September through early November is the best time.
  • In general, a pot for your rosemary should be about six inches deep and have well-drained soil to provide it with good air circulation. Cuttings from healthy plants will take root in less than two weeks if they’re planted at least three inches below ground level – so keep this in mind when deciding how many cuttings you need to plant!
  • Planting outside during winter may seem like an odd idea but as long as temperatures are consistently above 18F then it can produce new growth all year round – just remember that frosty or snowy weather will kill any unprotected transplants instantly!

Conclusion

Growing rosemary from cuttings is a great way to both propagate and enjoy this flavorful herb. If you’re looking for an easy project, it’s time to start cutting your fresh herbs!

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