One of the most common questions that people ask me is how to fix stem rot. I am always happy to help, so in this blog post, I will give you a list of all my tried and true methods for fixing monstera stem rot. If you follow these instructions, your plant should be healthy and happy within no time!

How to Fix Monstera Root/Stem/Leaf Rot

Get the Monstera Out of the Soil

This is the first and most important step to take when trying to fix monstera root rot. If it’s in your potting soil, you need to remove the plant from that soil and place it into a new container without any other plants in with it.

Treatment for Root Rot

Once you’ve moved your plant out of its old soil, it’s time to try and fix the root rot. There are many different treatments for monstera stem rot so I’m going to list some of my favorites here:

  • Sterilize with bleach or hydrogen peroxide (your choice)
  • Plant in clean potting soil without any other plants mixed in
  • Sterilize the potting soil and the roots with bleach
  • Use an antifungal solution or tea tree oil on the root area (my favorite!)

Treatment for Leaf Rot

If you’re noticing that your leaves are getting brown spots, this could be a sign of leaf rot. The best way to fix this is to take the leaf off of the stem and place it in a bowl or jar with water for about an hour.

Doing this will allow you to inspect the underside of your leaves and determine if they can be saved, or if they need to be removed completely because there’s too much rot.

Steps To Prevent Monstera Stem Rot

Now that I’ve shown you how to fix monstera stem rot, it’s time for me to show you my tried and true methods of preventing this from happening in the future!

  • Keep your plant in potting soil without any other plants mixed into it
  • Plant Monsteras so they are about an inch or two shorter than the bottom of your pot
  • If you notice any signs of root rot, try to remove them and take steps to treat it as quickly as possible
  • Rotate where you place plants in your soil every other week or so (this will help avoid plant disease)

Inspect Your Monstera for Any Pests

If you notice any bugs, this could be where your stem rot comes from. I recommend spraying the plant with neem oil to get rid of those pesky little critters!

  • Check leaves for tiny holes (signs that mealybugs are present)
  • Look inside potting soil and on roots for white goo or small black bugs (signs of root mealybugs)
  • Look on the underside of leaves for small brown gnats or eggs with long legs poking out from behind them (signs of aphids)

Mealybugs

Mealybugs are one of the most common pests that will attack your Monstera. This is because they produce honeydew, which can cause leaf rot and attract other bugs to come in and feed on it. The best way to get rid of mealybugs is by spraying neem oil onto them a few times a day for about a week.

Root Mealybugs

If mealybug infestation is worse near the roots, this could be root mealybugs. They are difficult to see with the naked eye so I recommend using a magnifying glass or even just forgetting about looking for them and spraying neem oil around the base of your plant instead! The bugs will be drawn to the plant and will die.

Aphids

If you notice small brown gnats or eggs with legs poking out from behind them on your leaves, this is a sign that aphids are feeding off of your monstera’s sap. The best way to get rid of these bugs is by spraying neem oil onto them in order to kill them.

Aphids are a sign of root mealybugs and it’s important to take the steps to get rid of these bugs before they cause any more damage!

Spider Mites

Spider mites are a common pest that feeds off of your plant. They usually go unnoticed because they’re so tiny and the damage is often only visible under magnification. The best way to get rid of spider mites is by spraying neem oil on them or using insecticidal soap to suffocate them!

If you notice any bugs, be sure to fix the problem as soon as you can. You don’t want these pests damaging your plant. I recommend spraying the plant with neem oil to get rid of those pesky little critters!

Thrips

If you notice small black or brown bugs with wings on your plant, then these are most likely thrips. This is because they suck the sap out of plants and leave a sticky residue behind them when they’re done feeding. The best way to get rid of these pests is by spraying neem oil onto them until there’s no more left!

Soft Scale

Soft scales are a type of small crustacean that causes leaf rot and they will also suck the sap out of your plant. This is because soft scales attach themselves to the stems or leaves, sucking up nutrients as well! You can get rid of them using neem oil.

Leaf Rot

If you notice that your leaves have brown spots, this could be because of leaf rot. The best way to fix this is by removing the leaf from the stem and placing it in a bowl or jar of water for about an hour. You can inspect the underside of your leaf to determine if they are okay to save, or need to be removed because there’s too much rot present.

  • When you remove leaves with severe disease, make sure that you disinfect them before adding them back into your soil
  • If you’re noticing leaf rot in your potting plants, the best thing to do is cut off all of the foliage and leave just a few inches for new leaves. This will help prevent other plant diseases from coming back as well!
  • Choose a container with drainage holes to take care of any excess water that may be accumulating because of the rotting leaves
  • Place a layer of pebbles at the bottom to help ensure that not too much water will be sitting around your roots, causing more rot
  • It’s best if you only use potting soil with no other plants mixed in it as this could cause plant diseases. You may want to consider using coconut coir, perlite, or sand as the potting soil instead to help prevent root rot
  • Water your plants less frequently than you would normally and ensure that they are well-drained before watering them again
  • Be sure to rotate where you place plants in your soil so there’s no time for plant diseases. Remember – rotate every other week!

Remove and Dispose of All the Affected Areas of Your Monstera

If you have a stem rot, leaf rot, spider mite infestation, or any other type of bug on your plant that’s causing damage to the leaves and stems – remove them as soon as possible! Make sure not to let these bugs spread onto healthy parts of the plant.

Repot the Monstera Plant

Repotting in a New Pot

If your monstera plant has been in the same pot for a while, it’s time to repot. This is not just because of too much water or nutrients getting trapped at the bottom of the pot. When you do this, you can help prevent stem rot by giving more room for roots and allowing them to grow out instead of remaining compact.

Re-using the Old Pot

If you’re going to repot your monstera plant in the same pot, don’t use any other plants. This is because they can transfer their diseases and mess up your soil, causing more problems for your plant. Instead of using too many pots or a new container altogether, it’s best if you just take some pebbles and place them in the bottom of the pot.

Place a layer of pebbles at the bottom to help ensure that not too much water will be sitting around your roots, causing more rot. You may want to consider using coconut coir, perlite, or sand as the potting soil instead to help prevent root rot.

Use a Well-Draining Potting Soil

When your monstera has stem rot, it’s important to make sure you use well-draining potting soil. If the water can’t move through the soil quickly enough, this will cause root rot in plants with a thick stem such as Monsteras. Make sure that your plant is planted at least six inches (15 centimeters) deep in the pot, and never let it sit directly on a wet surface.

When watering your plant, make sure to water from below so that all of the excess water is able to drain through the soil without sitting around for long periods or pooling up on top. Don’t overcrowd plants with stem rot – give each one as much space as possible.

Location of your Monstera pot

If possible, try to place your pot in an area that has a good amount of natural light. This is because too much darkness can cause stem rot and make the plant weaker over time. Make sure you’re not putting it under anything like curtains or furniture so that all parts get enough sunlight!

Conclusion

You can help prevent stem rot in your Monstera plant by giving it enough space, always keeping the soil well-draining, and using a good potting mix. Make sure you’re not overwatering or letting too much water sit around on top of roots for long periods of time!

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